Digi Domi

Sharing my passion for technology and learning.

Credit where credit is due.

on December 16, 2014

For certain reflective, portfolio based professional accreditation and titles you are required to detail your impact and influence in the High Education (HE) community. Trying to assess if you’ve had an impact on people within HE is pretty difficult. It’s a pretty abstract thing to contemplate, and certainly for me difficult to evidence. People tend not to email me after a presentation to say how much the appreciated it and detail what changes they will make based upon it. Does that mean I’m not having an impact and should stop presenting? Sometimes kind people will come up to me afterwards and say they enjoyed a presentation, or say something nice like ‘thank you’. How am I supposed to capture that? Should I wear a wire? Or say ‘thank you so much, I’m glad it was helpful. If you could just send that to me in an email so I can later potentially use it as evidence in a qualification or bid for promotion that would be great!’. That all feels a little bit more arrogant an egotistical than I’m (currently) happy with.

To that effect, when I’ve been to a presentation or read an article that has impacted how I think and perhaps enhanced or changed my practice would I ever think to then contact that person and let them know? My current behavior would say no, I don’t and so that person would never know what a positive and helpful effect they’ve had on me. Should I let them know? They might also find it helpful for a job application, qualification or accreditation. Personally I’d feel a bit creepy contacted someone unprompted with that kind of praise. Is that just a British thing? There is no reason I should be socially concerned about giving someone a compliment¬†or telling them they’ve helped me, most people like to hear that kind of thing and it would probably make the person (and me) happy if I did do it.

I suppose I will try and Tweet someone if they have done a good presentation to say it was good, but even that can feel a bit gushy. As such a tweet is instantaneous, it is unlikely I would follow up and tell them what impact they might have had on my practice long term. Should I offer follow-up?

This post is mostly just questions, I do realise, but it is mostly a though exercise for myself, and I felt that others might also benefit from reflecting on these questions. If you do have any thoughts, answers or suggestion feel free to post them in the comments.

If you changed something because of someone else, would you tell them?

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